HOA Loses Lawsuit Against Duval County Couple For FFL Yard!

Earlier this week a Duval County Judge ruled in favor of a Duval couple who had installed new landscaping following the 9 principles of Florida Friendly Landscapes (FFL).  Several years ago Dr. and Mrs. Jules Sidle decided to replace their St. Augustine grass with a friendlier and drought tolerant landscape as their home sat on a lot that borders a small lake which drains directly into the Intracoastal Waterway in Jacksonville.

By eliminating the numerous fertilizer applications throughout the year and reducing their use of irrigation the Sidles felt they were helping the environment and water quality in their neighborhood.  Hoping to encourage other homeowners to recognize their responsibility to protect such a precious natural resource, Dr. Sidle checked his HOA covenants and restrictions and filed an application in December, 2010, to remove his grass and replace it with numerous species of drought tolerant plants.  After 30 days his application was deemed approved (as stated in his HOA CC&Rs) and Jules began the arduous task of eliminating the grass in phase one of his plan.

FFL-Gold-Certified-Yard-in-Duval-County
My photo of Sidles’ yard taken June 1, 2013.

The HOA kept creating roadblocks for the Sidles with several more meetings with the ARB, requiring a FFL Gold certification and everything else they could think of.  Of course the Sidles complied with every request and became the first Gold certified FFL yard in Duval County!  Then in mid 2012 the HOA filed a lawsuit about the entire yard but later amended it to address the area between the sidewalk and street citing a covenant that states the homeowner must “maintain” the front strip between the sidewalk and street…covenants don’t say anything about “must be planted with St. Augustine grass”.

Mediation was scheduled.  The mediator (a retired attorney in Gainesville) worked with the HOA attorney, the Sidles and their attorney in 2012 with both parties reaching an agreement. The HOA attorney called the HOA President with the outcome which he completely rejected even after giving their attorney complete representation.

So back on the road to a trial!  Prior to the trial a hearing before the Judge  was scheduled in early June, 2013, which I also attended.  Of course nothing was decided at that hearing, both attorneys were heard, each providing case law and reasons for a ruling in his favor.  Everyone waited and waited for the Judge’s ruling which finally came this week.  The Judge ruled in favor of the Sidles on both counts: the Sidles had submitted their application pursuant to the Covenants and Restrictions, even though the Board asked for clarification at the February, 2011 Board meeting. Citing that clarification as a new application they still missed responding within 30 days of that so-called “new” application, and the application was again deemed approved after no response within the time frame.  As the plan submitted originally showed the area between the sidewalk and street to be planted with a ground cover this was also deemed as acceptable in the ruling.

Should anyone need to cite this court case for their own lawsuit, the Fourth Judicial Circuit Duval County Case number is: 16-2012-CC-007430, Division CC-N.  Coincidentally the HOA has now posted rules as to what they will allow homeowners incorporating FFL principles into their landscapes.  It does state the area between the sidewalk and street must be planted with grass.

Thank you to Susan and Jules Sidle and all the rest who have helped uphold the Florida Statutes addressing Florida Friendly Landscape principles with drought tolerant yards and have made our water a little safer!  Each one of these cases will hopefully make it easier for the next homeowner who is intimidated by their HOA Board when applying to install a FFL yard.

67 thoughts on “HOA Loses Lawsuit Against Duval County Couple For FFL Yard!

  1. Native and Uncommon Plants Facebook has beautiful pictures. Leslie Pierpoint did my yard in my Duval County HOA with no problem as she used the new FF statue to educate the board members. I received some nasty comments as my yard was the first but now there are 4 or 5 and they approve all.

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  2. I’m not from the US and never heard of a ‘HOA’ before – how totally bizarre that some busybodies can actually tell others what kind of plants they are allowed to grow. It seems so at odds with what we in Europe think about U.S. culture, that they would accept this kind of overbearing, litigious petty authority!

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    1. You should read “Neighbors At War!” by Ward Lucas. You’ll get the true picture of life in an HOA in America. His website is an eye-opener, too. http://www.neighborsatwar.com The book and ebook are available on Amazon. You’ll be glad you educated yourself before they start building HOAs near you! You’ll be armed with information to fight and stop these nightmares before they get started.

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    2. HOA’s Are a bunch of want to be Narcosistic Communist that don’t want anyone’s property to look better then theirs and want everyone to look like them or they are going to fine you and/or take you to court. Why in the world anyone would want to buy property in an area like this were everyone else can tell you what you can and can’t do on the Property that “YOU” just bought. Some go as far as telling you what kind and color plants you allowed to grow and Curtians you can have in your windows. And Heaven Forbid you try to put up and Fly an American Flag!!!! They will have you in court. So to all you HOA’s People you can kiss my behind as I got 10 acres in Brooksville you will never tell me what I can and Can’t do!!

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  3. I run Native and Uncommon Plants in Ortega and work with homeowners to plant natives instead of St. aug., which is the hardest plant to grow in NE FL. Gov. Christ signed a bill into law that states a homeowner is allowed to install FFL to reduce WATER use and not follow HOA, why couldn’t that have been used in this lawsuit? I use that when I have to meet with ARBs to explain what I’m doing.

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      1. FS 720.3035 goes on to say

        “Neither the association nor any architectural, construction improvement, or other such similar committee of the association shall enforce any policy or restriction that is inconsistent with the rights and privileges of a parcel owner set forth in the declaration of covenants or other published guidelines and standards authorized by the declaration of covenants, whether uniformly applied or not. Neither the association nor any architectural, construction improvement, or other such similar committee of the association may rely upon a policy or restriction that is inconsistent with the declaration of covenants or other published guidelines and standards authorized by the declaration of covenants, whether uniformly applied or not, in defense of any action taken in the name of or on behalf of the association against a parcel owner.”

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        1. 373.185 is FFL Ordinance and it does not govern community associations. The Statutes that apply to associations are
          FS 720 for HOAs
          FS 718 for Condos

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            1. A thorough review of the association’s Declaration, CC&Rs, and applicable Statutes by competent counsel is crucial before embarking in legal disputes. This applies to owners and boards. This case had no basis to move forward simply because the HOA had failed to comply with the 30 day time frame. FFL did not enter the equation in the ruling, only the Covenants did. I think both parties were sorely mislead.

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            2. Jax Cam – I not sure both parties were mislead: it’s more about a power play. I agree that the legal ruling totally was about procedure and not Florida Friendly landscaping. However, if the owners had not applied to have a “different” type of yard, I would bet the HOA would not have sued them. The most frustrating part is that all these lawsuits, all initiated by the HOA boards, are because some architectural control and board members don’t like the look of anything but green lawn. They can’t be educated about Florida Friendly landscaping because they don’t want to be educated. The board members also know that they are spending very little of their own money, as opposed to the defendant who may have to pay for the lawsuit twice. In my opinion, the HOA attorney who represents these kind of board members, doesn’t care about whether the HOA will win or not. The attorney makes money, no matter the outcome. I know of one HOA board who fired their attorney because he wouldn’t initiate a lawsuit against homeowners who installed groundcover instead of sod. Then they found an auto accident attorney to file the lawsuit. Now the auto accident attorney is apparently an expert on HOA law because he has added homeowners association representation to his advertisements. (This case is still ongoing). I’ve attended many HOA seminars where knowledgeable real estate and HOA attorney’s preach against the board members suing homeowners for non-financial issues. They believe that no one wins in these kinds of lawsuits.

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            3. Amen…isn’t that the truth! HOA Boards should only sue if there is a financial issue, not a selective enforcement issue. The same HOA Board that sued the Duval County couple for their FFL yard didn’t bother about the couple next door who installed a brick paver patio in the front yard without approval! Of course this couple was good friends with one of the Board members.

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          1. 373.185 also has provisions which apply to homeowners’ associations:
            “3(a) The Legislature finds that the use of Florida-friendly landscaping and other water use and pollution prevention measures to conserve or protect the state’s water resources serves a compelling public interest and that the participation of homeowners’ associations and local governments is essential to the state’s efforts in water conservation and water quality protection and restoration.
            (b) A deed restriction or covenant may not prohibit or be enforced so as to prohibit any property owner from implementing Florida-friendly landscaping on his or her land or create any requirement or limitation in conflict with any provision of part II of this chapter or a water shortage order, other order, consumptive use permit, or rule adopted or issued pursuant to part II of this chapter.
            (c) A local government ordinance may not prohibit or be enforced so as to prohibit any property owner from implementing Florida-friendly landscaping on his or her land.
            (4) This section does not limit the authority of the department or the water management districts to require Florida-friendly landscaping ordinances or practices as a condition of any permit issued under this chapter”.

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            1. You sound knowledgeable about HOAs. I thought I was, too until I read “Neighbors At War!” by Ward Lucas. He spent forty years as an investigative reporter for a Denver television station. His book will blow you away! I’ve had attorneys tell me they have learned so much from his book about HOAs. His website is also an eye-opener.

              Board members seem to love lawsuits because they are not paying for them out of their pockets. Yet, lawsuits are know to depreciate the property values, cause insurance companies to cancel policies, and turn neighbors into enemies. Exactly how does that retain property values as HOAs preach they do? It doesn’t and they don’t.

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            2. Nila, I’ve looked at the Neighbors at War website and I am surprised I hadn’t found it earlier in my searches for HOA info. Thank you for pointing it our. I’ve used the CCFJ website to research information here in Florida, but hadn’t seen any other really useful information until recently finding this Green Florida Brokers blog. Just one or two peeks at some of the resource links on Neighbors At War website is well worth the clicks to Ward’s website. I have been following the fight for FL friendly lawns for several years since we have been sued by our HOA 3 years ago. The lawsuit is still ongoing. Greenflbroker.com has pulled together many of us Florida homeowners into one place to share resources and stories specifically for Florida. We discuss the rights we were given by the Florida legislature to have Florida-friendly lawns. However, HOA’s still have massive control over individual homeowners and are not afraid of breaking laws. There are no individual consequences for power and control freak HOA members when they break the law. In my opinion, an HOA board suing an individual homeowner, especially for non-financial issues, is operating at a level equal to a scam artist. The HOA member is using their power and position to scam the other homeowners into believing this is the best and/or only solution to the perceived problem. The HOA board uses very little of his/her own money as it is pooled with everyone else in the community. Most of the other homeowners won’t complain because 1) they don’t want to be the next target, or 2) they don’t want to get involved because they may have to make an educated decision to support either the board or the homeowner, or 3) it’s not costing them that much more money out their pockets, or 4) they don’t have the time to even want to get involved in the HOA politics because, let’s face it, times are tough and most homeowners are busy with work and family.

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            3. Thanks for the kind words Susan! I want to also mention the Facebook group, Homeowners For Florida Friendly Yards, which is where most of the conversations about the lawsuits take place. Nila, please consider joining the group to provide more valuable information to other homeowners.

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          2. Sorry jax cam but 373.185 specifically was written to govern HOA on Florida friendly. This was the entire purpose and 100% of legislatures voted yes.

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    1. Yes, Leslie. My yard you did 4 years ago is beautiful. His attorney screwed up and whether he’s a nice guy as a poster said or not, he didn’t bother to educate himself to the two rights( flag & FF landscaping) that all residents in HOAs are guaranteed under Florida statue! Would have taken that ” great” attorney about 5 minutes to educate himself. Guess whose paying the price?

      Not really sure which one is more questionable and irrational, the HOA or this surely expensive but totally misguided & or ignorant lawyer.

      Lesson here is Do your own research. Lawyers have been hit by the recession too. There is no good reason he would argue contract law over the pertinent one, the one that expressly states HOAs cannot refuse FF landscapes.

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  4. HOAs are worthless, time consuming entities, and most times serve no useful purpose other than giving people a position (on the board) to exercise their power hungry ways. We dissolved ours 25 years ago and our neighborhood is beautiful. Local code enforcement and the local permitting processes are all that are needed.

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      1. I am not familiar with the process of dissolving a Florida HOA but my guess is that it may be quite complicated. What is more common is the expiration of the HOA CC&Rs after 30 years and what is known as MRTA (marketable record title act.) It is addressed in FS 720.

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        1. It’s probably just as hard to dissolve an HOA as it is to get a new CC&R passed…most CC&Rs require 2/3 majority vote of the homeowners which is usually pretty difficult. And then how does a community pool, if there is one, and all the common areas get maintained? I like the idea of recalling Board members instead, as long as someone else is willing to step up to the plate.

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          1. The CC&R’s might have a section pertaining to termination of the HOA and dissolution of the Declaration. The older HOA’s had a provision where they would be automatically dissolved after a certain period of time or the expiration of the CD&R’s (as Jax Cam stated). Our bylaws state that the association may be dissolved by a vote of the members at a meeting called for that specific reason (to terminate the HOA). The Declaration states that it takes 100% of the members voting yes to terminate it. We don’t own a community pool, but there is common property. We also have a Community Development District, so the property could be transferred to the CDD for upkeep.

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  5. As it turns out I know that small community very well because I live nearby. I also have friends there. There are 3 male directors in the HOA who have been in office for several years. The good news is that it appears that since the court ruling 2 female directors have come on board making a total of 5 board members. I also know who the management company is, and it does not surprise me if they are called “inept” because most likely they are. It is a very small mom & daughter type of operation. I do not know who was the attorney representing the HOA but again it does not surprise me that he may have provided a misguided and counter productive advice to the board. I do not know of a single law firm or attorney in Duval, St Johns or Nassau counties (NE FL) who are experienced and knowleageable in FL Condo and HOA Law. You have to contact attorneys in Orlando if you expect sound advice. Most attorneys hired by community associations in NE Florida are actually real estate attorneys. I am not surprised at the ruling either. It was the easy way out for the judge. Judges and/or magistrates in the above mentioned counties have very little or zero familiarity with FL Condo & HOA Law or FFL.

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    1. Thank you for your feedback! You make several good points including the one about the HOA attorney. You should ask your friends in Marsh Sound to forward the new ARB landscape guidelines to you which seem to have been written by that same attorney. Those guidelines leave so much out and have some incorrect information…it seems pretty likely to me there will be another lawsuit in there if someone else decides to become more responsible about their landscape.

      As for competent attorneys I will say the Sidles had an extremely knowledgable attorney about environmental issues including FFL principles. I met with him a couple times and attended that hearing with the Judge and he was very good!

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      1. Expertize in FFL is not absolutely necessary , however, familiarity with FL Statutes is.

        FS 720.3035(1) says in part:

        “The authority of an association or any architectural, construction improvement, or other such similar committee of an association to review and approve plans and specifications for the location, size, type, or appearance of any structure or other improvement on a parcel, or to enforce standards for the external appearance of any structure or improvement located on a parcel, shall be permitted only to the extent that the authority is specifically stated or reasonably inferred as to such location, size, type, or appearance in the declaration of covenants or other published guidelines and standards authorized by the declaration of covenants.”

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      2. In my opinion this case could have been resolved a lot faster if the defense attorney would have responded in strong terms citing the applicable provisions of Florida Statute 720, which governs HOAs in Florida. Judging by the Plaintiff’s attorney website, this law firm appears to focus on Family Law, Domestic Violence, Real Estate, Foreclosure Defense, and Landlord/Tenant. As I said before I have not been able to find any attorney or law firm in NE FL that is knowleageable and competent in FL HOA & Condo Law and FL Administrative Code. Some Jacksonville attorneys have jumped at the opportunity to do collections for Condos and HOAs, however, this new venture does not necessarily qualify a lawyer to represent the association in Court in cases involving violation/enforcement of Covenants and/or FFL. These are very nuanced subjects that requires outmost competency.

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        1. Actually I believe the Florida Statutes were brought up very early in the lawsuit, as well as the initial meeting with the Board of Directors that I attended and through the mediator. The resulting Judgment did not address the Florida Statutes as it seems there are no rulings (that I am aware of) that were based solely on the wording of the Florida Statutes. As I mentioned earlier, the law firm of Gray-Robinson, PA in Jacksonville, particularly Sydney Ansbacher, is very qualified to represent any environmentally based legal complaints. I found him to be one of the most outstanding attorneys I have seen in action. As far as the plaintiff’s attorney I would agree he was not very qualified and you’re right about lots of attorneys jumping on the “environmental” bandwagon since this seems to be a hot topic these days.

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  6. As a board member of a large Florida HOA community, I might have a somewhat different view of this. First, it does appear the HOA was at fault in not following its required process. That is not uncommon, as most HOA boards and their Property Managers are, in my opinion, inept. I fully support HOA’s following applicable law, including FFL law. But HOA’s do have some discretion in restricting what sort of changes are made to lawns under FFL requests. The key is to insure the HOA architectural committee (and the PM) understands FFL and their covenants. Again, that’s a crapshoot. I do have reservations about FFL law, as the vast majority of homeowners overwater their lawns and have no regard for their waste of water or their pollution from incorrect application of lawn chemicals. fFL is wee-intended, but generally ineffective.

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    1. Thank you, I am so glad to hear from an HOA Board member, especially one who is familiar with the Florida Statutes pertaining to FFL! I agree with you that most HOA boards and Property Managers are inept. However, in both their defenses it is a matter of education as this is relatively new to most people…how many people in this watery State of Florida even realize we have water issues? FFL may be “wee-intended” but it is a platform from which the education can grow!

      I worked for over a year with 2 local HOA Boards in trying to get them to understand the effects of the Florida Statutes on their community ARB guidelines. My goal with HOA Boards is to explain those Statutes are out there and more people are becoming aware of the negative effects of commercial fertilizers and wasting water. If and when they understand the potential of these statutes I try to encourage them to address them now in their ARB guidelines so they can “marry” the FFL principles and their ideas of “curb appeal”…isn’t that what it’s all about to the HOA Board? I highly recommend to each HOA Board and Property Management group to address and incorporate those principles ASAP BEFORE one of their residents makes an application to install a FFL yard and then possibly end up in a lawsuit when the HOA Board doesn’t care for the resident’s vision.

      As a Board member of a large FL HOA community I hope you will plan to attend the University of Florida’s FFL Symposium On October 8, 2013 at the Weedon Island Preserve in Pinellas County. This Symposium is directed towards HOA Boards, Property Managers and interested homeowners and is an excellent opportunity to get learn more about what is going on in different areas, what issues are arising and several other topics. Let me know if you need more information and I will put you in touch with the gentleman handling all the details.

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    2. If using Florida Friendly Landscaping practices saves money and resources for the HOA, than you, as an HOA Board member, have the fiduciary duty to use those practices. You also have the responsibility to educate your homeowners. Most of the Florida county extension services will send out their HOA liaison to meet with board members and give them suggestions on using Florida Friendly landscaping in common areas and throughout the neighborhood. If the board members set an example, it’s easier for homeowners to “get it”. There are any number of publications available for HOA’s to use to educate the homeowners. Not having high maintenance lawns saves everyone time and money and resources. We had to replace sections of our St. Augustine sod twice a year to keep the HOA from sending violation letters. I don’t believe in fertilization and pest control for my lawn, so you know that St. Augustine doesn’t do well without either of those. And it definitely doesn’t do well on water restriction schedules. Most HOA documents do not address the types of plants that can be used in a landscape. If they did, who decides on what would be the right plant at the right place? Are HOA board members qualified as horticulturists, or landscape architects? Are all the yards in the neighborhood the same type of soil?

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    3. As a board member you should read this recently released book by Ward Lucas, “Neighbors At War!” It’s a MUST read for anybody in an HOA and it will help you keep from getting into a big nasty expensive mess if one of your board members goes rogue and tries to create legal nightmares for your HOA. His website is an interesting and educational daily read as well. http://www.neighborsatwar.com

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    1. Personally, I love Val and Eli’s yard. I would prefer more native plantings, although who can argue with growing food? The reality is that most HOA’s and even local city governments would rather spend time and money fighting against those types of yards than encouraging them. Last word: It would be really hard to park a car on a front yard covered in food, wouldn’t it? 🙂

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  7. Typical HOA bullies. Want to bet how fast their plants will ‘mysteriously’ start to die or be dug up in the middle of the night???

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    1. Since they are on the main road of the community it doesn’t seem likely disappearing plants will happen, but you never know. They’ve already gone through one phase of hate letters which hopefully won’t repeat itself. They did receive a letter the same day of the ruling of a “garbage can”, their yard waste can, that has been there for 10 years is now, all of a sudden able to be seen from the street! I’m sure the HOA Board President is seething since he was instrumental in pursuing a lawsuit which cost the HOA a hefty amount of legal fees!

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  8. Thanks for this story – I’m very interested in this topic. It appears that the ruling is stating that the Sidles submitted a plan and it was approved (by default because of the 30-day limit) and so it should be allowed. It doesn’t seem to address the issue of whether or not a HOA can say no to Florida Friendly changes to the yard. Also, you mention they have now posted rules saying the area between the sidewalk and the street must be St. Augustine grass. I would think the new law would make this type of rule “difficult” – and potentially subject to a new legal test if someone decides to ignore it. Have I interpreted the information correctly?

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    1. Yes, it does seem that you have interpreted everything correctly. In reality it does not appear any of the Judgments filed actually address the Florida Statutes or the rights of an HOA to deny FFL yards, unless one of the members of the Facebook group – Homeowners for Florida Friendly Yards – can shed any light based on their own lawsuits. I’ll post that question to the group to see if anyone has a ruling based solely on the ability of an HOA to deny a FFL application.

      The revised ARB guidelines for the Marsh Sound community have a number of questionable items that seem to make enforcement difficult or almost selective. It will be interesting to see how it plays out.

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      1. Snailkite makes a great point about the ruling. According to your blog, the HOA did make them go through the process of FFL Gold certification, so the HOA was aware, at that time, that they couldn’t just deny the entire landscaping. Then there is the issue of their governing documents not specifying what types of plants/grass must be planted in the easement area – was that even addressed? I’m wondering if some of these rulings and judgments are based on other issues because the courts don’t want to rule on strictly Florida Friendly principles? I would turn this around and sue the HOA for breach of fiduciary duty for their rule of having grass in the easement area. With all the information available about the cost of maintaining grass and the negative effects on the environment, the HOA board could be negligent in enforcing this type of planting.

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        1. The HOA Board made the Sidles get FFL Gold certified thinking they would never be able to get the certification. Once the yard was certified gold the Board did not believe them and wanted all the paperwork to prove that someone from the Extension Center had actually been to the property to certify it. They are now aware, from all the proceedings in the past 2 1/2 years, that if the Sidles had replaced the strip of land between the sidewalk and street with St. Augustine grass they would have no longer been certified Gold due to irrigation requirements.

          I agree, the Board is negligent in its’ guidelines for residents, especially since the community lakes feed into the Intracoastal Waterway. As far as suing the HOA Board for breach of fiduciary duty I believe the Sidles have had enough with lawsuits for the moment and are glad this is finally over. However the new neighbor down the street, who received 3 violations within the first 2 weeks of moving in, might be taking up the slack since he was first cited for a lawn that needed to be cut (house was a foreclosure and not kept up) and then for replacing all the dead St. Augustine grass. How’s that for a “welcome to the community”?

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  9. All you need to do is look at the recent aerial photograph of Jupiter Inlet to know we have to change our ways. It is an eyeopener. Wish I could post the picture.

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    1. Perhaps you could share a URL link? I used some search terms for pollution in Jupiter Inlet and found all sorts of maps and documents…all very enlightening. I also found a July, 2013 Palm Beach Post blog article about the local polluted run-off and the overflow from the chemical laden Lake Okeechobee…definitely an eye opener!

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  10. I think it Is sad, when someone tries to do so much good…and then is sued after doing everything right. I hope they did not have to pay one penny for their court cost, and hope all their attorney fee’s were paid for and even the cost of their plants!!! this is a stinking shame!!!

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    1. You’re right Sherry, it is sad! The Sidles did have to pay their attorney fees (both sides were required to pay their own costs). Fortunately their attorney has such a passion for environmental issues that he did put a cap on his fees. The unfortunate side is there will probably be an assessment to the homeowners to recover their attorney fees, which in reality means the Sidles will have to pay for attorney fees to sue themselves! Obviously the one who made the most money on all this was the HOA attorney!

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  11. Thank you for your article and close attention to detail. We all need to maintain Florida Friendly Yards to protect our watery state of Florida. I am fortunate to live in an unincorporated area of Marion County and we don’t have an HOA here, so I grow my lawn to suit myself. As I type this I can look out at my front yard and enjoy the fact that bees, butterflies and wasps are feeding on the flowers of Iron weed, Lantana, Twin Flower and many other wild, indigenous and low maintenance plants. I don’t need to weed, water or fertilize any part of my lawn.

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    1. Judy, you are indeed lucky! Sadly I believe more homeowners who wish to do good for the environment and have a distaste for HOA disputes are regretting moving into a nice community whose HOA Board won’t allow them to do something good because one or two of the Board members think a lawn has to be be green St. Augustine grass…period!

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    2. Would you post a photo of your yard? I am reducing my grass areas to wide paths between low maintenance plantings/native/wildflower, while leaving a small patch of grass for my pup.

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      1. There was a picture of the Duval County yard in the article, just click on the “more” button and you should see the picture. My yard is a “work in progress”. I eliminated the irrigation system and do not fertilize so I am on my way expanding one bed at a time with no pictures at this time.

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      2. Leslie Pierpoint Facebook page Native and Uncommon Plants has tons of information. She did my yard in my over 55 HOA back in 2009 and she knows how to talk to the reticent ARB members.
        I received some negative comments but now 5-6 yards have gone FF and our ARB approves them with no problem. If you live in Duval County she the one you want.

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        1. @2dogsonly. You should not volunteer your “legal” opinions unless you are an experienced practicing FL attorney with ample exposure to FL HOAs matters and also litigation.

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      1. Jeannette Moore…thanks for the tip on the Facebook page…Homeowners For Florida Friendly Yards. I will join all of you there and be more than happy to share what I have learned in hundreds of thousands of hours of research about HOAs across America. The problems are much more massive and serious than most HOA homeowners think. Education is what is needed to help our national movement in the effort to reform and/or abolish these HOAs that are destroying home ownership in America.

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